Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc



Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 11/19/2017

You have finally found what you believe to be the perfect home. Then, something rings off in your gut. Maybe it was poor communication with the seller. Maybe a big change happened in your own life in a short period of time. All you know is that you really want to back out of the deal. You might have a lot of questions. Is this possible? Are there consequences? 


The short answers to these questions are yes, and yes. There is a possibility that you could be sued by your backing out of a deal. Itís rare that buyers are actually mandated to buy a home that they donít actually want to buy. Sellers will, however, be able to keep any money that has already been paid as a deposit after a certain point in the dealings on a home sale. Sellers may also be awarded damages in some cases. 


Legally Backing Out Of The Contract


There are a few circumstances where buyers may have a legitimate right to back out of a contract on a home. If certain contingencies werenít met, as a buyer, youíre free and clear to walk away. These circumstances include:


  • Financing falls through
  • You couldnít sell your former home
  • Flaws in the home have not been disclosed
  • Property boundary line issues exist
  • Liens are against a homeís title
  • The seller does not meet the terms for improvement
  • Undisclosed uses exist for the land such as a pathway


If none of these reasons apply to you and you still have reservations about buying the home, you may need to sacrifice a huge chunk of money. The way that you exit the deal will all depend upon the contracts that were signed previously.


Other Buyers Are Waiting For The Home


If you are in a tight market and decide to back out of buying a home, you could be in luck. Often, if thereís a backup offer, itís enough to satisfy a seller that at least the home will be sold promptly. However, donít hold you breath when it comes to getting your deposits back. If you have already ďpromisedĒ to buy a home, you can kiss the deposit goodbye, unfortunately. 


Always Hire A Real Estate Attorney


Whether your state requires it or not, you should always hire a real estate attorney. These professionals can help you to read each and every line of the contracts that youíre signing when buying a home. They will make suggestions as to how you can protect yourself through the process along the way. Itís a good investment to hire a lawyer when youíre buying a home.





Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 3/20/2016

Is it a seller's market? A buyer's market? Depends on the day and which media outlet you happen to be listening to. One thing is sure the market is changing. Here are some ways to know what kind of market it is: These are the signs of a buyer's market High inventory or more than six months of inventory currently on the market. Sale prices are higher than active listing prices. Lower closed sale numbers. Declining median sales prices. Higher DOM or days on the market. Here are some signs of a seller's market Low inventory or less than six months of inventory currently on the market. Sale prices are lower than active listing prices. Higher closed sale numbers. Increasing median sales prices. Lower DOM or days on the market. These are signs of a balanced market Three to six months of inventory is currently on the market. Sale prices are similar to active listing prices. Stable sales numbers. Flat median sales prices. Days active on the market are approximately 30 to 45 days. If you want to know how to figure out the months of inventory there is a simple way to do that. Take the total number of active listings and the total number of sold or closed transactions on the market last month. Divide the number of total listings by the number of total sales, which results in the number of months of inventory remaining. Then you can determine what type of market it is.