Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc



Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 5/25/2015

Sunscreen is essential but buying sunscreen can be very confusing. From water resistant sunscreens to SPF to broad spectrum protection, it is hard to know what you need to keep your skin safe this summer. Sunscreens protect you from the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation from reaching your skin. There are two types of ultraviolet radiation, UVA and UVB. They both damage your skin and increase your risk of skin cancer. The difference between UVA and UVB Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is part of the electromagnetic (light) spectrum that reaches the earth from the sun. Ultraviolet A (UVA) is the longer wave UV ray that causes lasting skin damage, skin aging, and can cause skin cancer. Ultraviolet B (UVB) is the shorter wave UV ray that causes sunburns, skin damage, and can cause skin cancer. The definition of SPF SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor. The SPF number on sunscreen is a measure of a sunscreen's ability to prevent UVB from damaging the skin. The number of the SPF is how long it will take the sun to redden the skin. For example, SPF 15 sunscreen theoretically prevents reddening 15 times longer than no sunscreen at all– about five hours. What is broad spectrum? Sunscreens that have broad-spectrum protect the skin from both UVA and UVB rays. Beginning in December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will implement new rules for "broad-spectrum" products. New sunscreen rules Here are some of the new rules The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued for labels on sunscreen. • Sunscreens may be labeled “broad- spectrum” if they provide protection against both UVA and UVB radiation according to FDA-sanctioned test methods. • Only broad-spectrum sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or higher may state that they protect against skin cancer if used as directed with other sun protection measures. • Broad-spectrum sunscreens with SPFs of 2-14 must display a warning that the product has not been shown to help prevent skin cancer or early skin aging. • The terms “sunblock,” “sweatproof” and “waterproof” are no longer allowed on sunscreen labels. • Sunscreens may claim to be “water-resistant,” but must specify whether they protect the skin for 40 or 80 minutes of swimming or sweating, based on standard testing. Sunscreens that are not water-resistant must instruct consumers to use a water-resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating. • A company cannot claim that its sunscreen products provide sun protection for more than two hours without submitting test results to prove this.      




Categories: Buying a Home   Family  


Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 2/2/2014

Parenting has become more and more complicated and adding the internet to the mix makes it scary. Social media sites like Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook have parents scrambling with what to do. Social media sites are advancing so quickly that it often seems impossible for parents to keep up. Here are some hints on how to parent kids when it comes to technology: 1. Almost all social media sites have age requirements; follow and enforce them with your children. Most sites require children to be 13 to sign up, while other like Vine require users to be 17. 2. Just because the minimum age requirement is 13 or 17 your child should be mature and responsible enough to use good judgment offline before becoming active online. 3. Use social media. As a parent become active on social media sites. Join the same sites your children are using and learn how they work. Follow, friend, like them or do whatever the site requires for you to monitor their activity. Don't embarrass them by commenting on their posts just be there. 4. Review and implement privacy settings on social media accounts with your children. Remind your children not to share personal information about themselves, their family or their friends online. All profiles should be set to private. Kids should only accept friends or followers that they know in real life. 5. Stress manners. Remind children that interactions on social media are just like the "real world". Practice respect, good judgement, kindness, and always use proper language. 6. Social media is a privilege. If your children are misusing social media take the privilege away.





Posted by Duarte/Downey Real Estate Agency, Inc on 10/28/2012

When the summer heat comes knocking, many people reach for soft drinks and artificially flavored beverages.  While this may temporarily cool you down while satisfying your sweet tooth, you're actually doing your body a disservice by dumping so many empty calories into your system.  Additionally, many of these drink options actually dehydrate you further, prompting you to drink more of them sooner.  Here are five easy alternatives to reaching for a can of pop, or a bottle of "enhanced electrolyte-infused super sports drink"....Whatever that is. 1. Juice on Juice - Do you make your ice cubes with trays in your freezer?  If you do, try swapping out the water with juice!  You can have a glass of OJ with OJ ice cubes.  As they melt, they won't water down your juice of choice.  If you are feeling adventurous, you can make your own fruit juice combinations with matching juice cubes.  If you have a blender, you can make your own fruit slushies in a flash.  It's a pretty simple way to enjoy something flavorful, and you can feel better knowing that you aren't putting large amounts of empty calories into your system.  If you are craving something a little sweeter, why not try mixing in a little Stevia?  While relatively new to the US market, this wonder sweetener has been used for centuries by people in other countries.  Boasting a sweetening capability 300 times that of sugar, stevia has also been shown to have a negligible effect on blood glucose levels, making this sweetener relatively safe for people on carbohydrate-controlled diets. 2.  Cucumber Water - This is a relatively new concept to hit the mainstream, but it has been around for a long time.  Cucumbers are a perfect summer food...They contain vitamin C and caffeic acid, two antioxidant nutrients that can help protect the skin from the sun's damaging rays. Vitamin C boosts collagen and elastin, which helps keep skin looking vibrant. Caffeic acid protects skin cells from UV radiation. Cucumbers also help to prevent water retention, which will keep you feeling light and refreshed all day. There are a few different methods to make cucumber water, but I'll give the easiest here....Chop up a whole cucumber, throw it in a pitcher of water, and let it soak in the fridge overnight.  In the morning, drain the pieces of cucumber out, pour yourself a big glass of it over ice, throw a few slices of cucumber in as a garnish, and voila.  You have cucumber water.  Yes....It's that simple.  And you'll be pleasantly surprised how refreshing this new angle on water is. Raspberry Mint water - This is similar to the cucumber water, except that there's no overnight soaking required.  All you need is a water bottle, crushed ice, some fresh mint, and raspberries.  Throw five or six raspberries, a few mint leaves, and a small handful of crushed ice into a water bottle.  Shake well.  The ice will agitate the mint and raspberries.  Then, fill the bottle to the top with water, and shake again.  Goodbye, Crystal Light. Soda Water and Juice - If you find yourself craving the zip of bubbles in your beverage, try mixing plain soda water with citrus juices.  Two parts juice, one part soda water, and some ice is all you'll need to beat a soda craving.  Try mixing tangerine and grapefruit juice first, then move on to other juices. Iced Chai Tea - Chai has its roots in Ayurvedic medicine, but has come to be one of the world's most beloved teas.  Chai is a mixture of black teas and aromatic Indian spices.  Initially brought over to the west a few centuries ago, it has become a fixture in many coffeehouses and cupboards all across the United States, and can be purchased in your local grocery store.  If you like Iced tea, then take a chance on Iced Chai.  You won't regret it. Bring four cups of water to a boil, and add one chai bag per cup.  Steep for five to seven minutes, and transfer to a pitcher.  Allow the Chai to cool completely, and serve over ice.  You can add a bit of milk and sugar if you so desire, but the natural blend of Indian spice makes this tea flavorful all on its own. Here's to a healthy summer!




Tags: ice tea   summer fun   Healthy  
Categories: Family